Stormwater Management


What is Stormwater Runoff?  Why does it matter?

Stormwater is water that flows across the ground or pavement when it rains, or when snow and ice melt.  The water can drain into stormwater detention ponds, but often drains into storm sewers, which can be seen at street corners or low points on the sides of streets.  Collectively, the draining water is called stormwater runoff.

Stormwater Permit

Albemarle County Public Schools holds a General Permit for Car Wash Facilities for its car wash bay (featured below, left) at the Albemarle County Vehicle Maintenance Facility.  This permit requires us to submit an annual Discharge Monitoring Report (DMR) to the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (VDEQ) detailing the results of an annual sample of the effluent (wash water) from the car wash at a specified point (an "outfall") before it eventually enters a storm water detention pond.  The permit also requires us to keep weekly inspection logs of any maintenance performed on our oil water separators (featured below, right).  These separators help to keep oil, grease and sediment out of the wash water.

 

 

What is Stormwater Runoff?  Why does it matter?

Stormwater is water that flows across the ground or pavement when it rains, or when snow and ice melt.  The water can drain into stormwater detention ponds, but often drains into storm sewers, which can be seen at street corners or low points on the sides of streets.  Collectively, the draining water is called stormwater runoff.

Stormwater Permit

Albemarle County Public Schools holds a General Permit for Car Wash Facilities for its car wash bay (featured at top left) at the Albemarle County Vehicle Maintenance Facility.  This permit requires us to submit an annual Discharge Monitoring Report (DMR) to the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (VDEQ) detailing the results of an annual sample of the effluent (wash water) from the car wash at a specified point (an "outfall") before it eventually enters a storm water detention pond.  The permit also requires us to keep weekly inspection logs of any maintenance performed on our oil water separators (featured at bottom left).  These separators help to keep oil, grease and sediment out of the wash water.

Rivanna Regional Stormwater Education Partnership (RRSEP)

Albemarle County Public Schools is a partner of the Rivanna Regional Stormwater Education Partnership (RRSEP).

The Partnership is comprised of local stormwater permit holders such as the City of Charlottesville, the University of Virginia, the Virginia Department of Transportation, the Rivanna Water & Sewer Authority, and Albemarle County.  The overall goal of the Partnership is to educate the public on the importance of stormwater management.

The Partnership has developed several stormwater-related Public Service Announcements.  To see these, click below:

As Albemarle County Public Schools' Environmental Management System (EMS) progresses, we will aim to incorporate more stormwater pollution prevention initiatives.

Related Information and Links:

Broadus Wood Elementary Biofilter

The biofilter construction at Broadus Wood Elementary began in August 2007.  The Broadus Wood Elementary School is located on a hill.  Historically, runoff from the site flowed down-gradient in all directions and eventually into various small channels.  Over many years, as the school was developed, almost all of the impervious surfaces associated with the school (rooftops, parking lots) has been redirected to just two directions: north and south within the ditch lying along the west side of State Route 663 and then through roadway culverts and eastward onto private property.  Generally, runoff from approximately the northern quarter of the site flows north while runoff from the southern three-quarters of the site flows south.  However, the northern and southern portions of the on-site storm sewer system are connected near the front of the school so there is some mixing of flows.

The biofilter was constructed within the boundaries of the walking/running track located on the south side of the school.  Stormwater is now intercepted from the manhole number located in the southern parking lot and piped into the biofilter.  Additional runoff from this parking lot is captured at the curb and directed into the biofilter on the surface.  The underdrain of the biofilter discharges through a new sewer system into the roadside ditch.